In-between

I’ve got a few spare minutes so I thought I’d write a quick post for Blogging Against Disablism Day 2014. There are other posts I want to write about disability, gender and fashion, about internalised disablism and about the questions strangers ask me when they notice that I am a disabled person. Those can wait.

Today I have only a few minutes and one very precise thing I want to write about. And that’s the difference between how people who aren’t disabled seem to conceive of disability and what being disabled is actually like.

Other people seem to think that for any and all “abilities” people can either do them or they can’t. So either you can walk perfectly well or you can’t walk at all. You can either talk or you can’t. You can either see properly or see nothing, you’re either hearing or profoundly Deaf. You’re permanently on the edge of seriously harming yourself or you’re completely fine. You can be easily sorted within seconds into “disabled and thus completely unable to do anything” or “perfectly capable of doing any kind of work without any real difficulty”.

A LOT of disablism seems to rest on this idea which looks very obviously absurd to anyone with any direct experience of being or living with a disabled person yet this idea seems to me to be widespread. Even the draconian implementation of the Work Capacity Assessment here in the UK seems based on this strange dichotomy of “you can either always do something or always not” and “you’re either fit for all kinds of work or none at all”. When people call the fraud hotline because they’ve seen a neighbour walk from their car to their door when they use a wheelchair or scooter to get to the corner shop, their disablism is based in the idea that people can either walk or they can’t and that anyone who can walk can work (btw, if you find me a job that literally only involves walking short distances a few times a day, message me :P).

The reality of disabled life is very different. There is no neat split between “Things I can always do” and “Things I can never do” – almost everything is inbetween. Almost everything is something I can do sometimes under some conditions. Some days I might be able to walk half a mile using a walking stick, other days I literally cannot get out of bed. Under the right conditions and with appropriate supervision, I can cook a meal for six people from scratch. Most days however, I need another person to come in and cook for me. I’m happy and confident and I love my life *and also I’m very mentally ill and in serious danger of neglecting and/or harming myself*. These are not contradictions. This is my reality and that of thousands of other people.

Disablism seeks to reduce me to a list of things that I always cannot do (and there are plenty) and proclaim me able to do many things on the basis of my ability to do them once or twice a year. The reality is more complex and diverse than that. I live in the space in between “can” and “can’t” and if non-disabled people ever really thought about it they’d realise that *they do too*.

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One thought on “In-between

  1. Thanks for this. I’ve tried to explain this to people a few times, but your personal examples just nail it. I really can’t understand people who can’t grasp that, just because someone can stand or walk a short distance, that doesn’t mean they don’t need that wheelchair.

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